EBM3: The State of the Arctic Biodiversity Terrestrial Report (StArT): the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program, Terrestrial

Date: Wednesday October 10

Location: Tieva, Lappia Hall

Time: 10:30-12:00

The State of The Arctic Biodiversity Terrestrial Report (START) will be published in 2019, and report on the status and trends of terrestrial ecosystems in the Arctic. The START is compiled by expert contributors to the CBMP Terrestrial and based on peer reviewed articles of key components of the terrestrial ecosystem that will be published as a special journal issue in Ambio. Presentations will cover the background for the work in the CBMP Terrestrial Group, including the overall structure and approach of the CBMP Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity Monitoring Plan. The session will present snapshots from the START results and explore ways to use the results for prioritising nature conservation work in the future, and address how to use knowledge and new technology in an effective way. The session will close with a discussion to provide comments and input to the work on the START report, including the development of key findings and advice for future monitoring, based on the identified data, knowledge gaps and information needs.

Chairs: Mora Aronsson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Swedish Species Information Centre; Starri Heiðmarsson, Icelandic Institute of Natural History

Format: Series of presentations followed by round table discussion

Presentations:

  1. Introduction to the CBMP Terrestrial, StArT and Special Journal Issue (Ambio): Sara Longan, North Slope Science Initiative pdf, Anchorage, Alaska and Niels Martin Schmidt, Aarhus University pdf
  2. Invasive species on a northward march: Kristine Westergaard, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research pdf
  3. Finding and measuring the invisible diversity, novel DNA methods with special reference to arctic invertebrates: Stephen Coulson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Swedish Species Information Centre pdf
  4. Current prioritization approaches – how well can we identify different priorities and the related challenges: Santtu Kareksela, Metsähallitus pdf
  5. START: key findings panel/roundtable: Moderator: Jason Taylor, National Parks Service
  • Knud FalkArctic Falcons Specialist Group
  • Virve Ravolainen, Norwegian Polar Institute
  • Stephen Coulson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Swedish Species Information Centre
  • Kristine Westergaard, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
  • Santtu Kareksela, Metsähallitus
  • Erica Oberndorfer, Labrador Institute Post-doctoral Fellow, CAFF-IASC Fellow
  • Cynthia Jacobson, CAFF Chair, US Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Sara Longan, North Slope Science Initiative, Anchorage
  • PP representative (tbc)

 


Abstracts:

Introduction to the CBMP Terrestrial and StArT

Sara Longan, North Slope Science Initiative, Anchorage, Alaska; Tom Christensen, Aarhus University

The StArT is compiled by expert contributors to the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program and based on peer reviewed articles of key components of the terrestrial ecosystem that will be published as a special journal issue in Ambio.

 

Finding and measuring the invisible diversity, novel DNA methods with special reference to Arctic invertebrates

Stephen Coulson, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Swedish Species Information Centre

Recent development in DNA technique has made biodiversity assessments possible that would have been impossible only few years ago. Special emphasis will be laid on barcoding in insects.

 

Invasive species on a northward march

Kristine Westergaard, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research

Climate change and human activity is opening the arctic to many different species which some may turn out to be invasive. In order to prevent irreversible damage, pathways must be known as well as dispersal agents. With the current situation mapped actions can be proposed and evaluated.

 

Current prioritization approaches – how well can we identify different priorities and the related challenges

Santtu Kareksela, Metsähallitus

With its vast area and sporadically known biodiversity the Arctic is in particular difficult concerning choosing what areas should be protected. In the presentation the software "Zonation" will be shown and given examples how it could be utilised.

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